Vanishing Point

A modern take on the crooked house where the disorientation of the viewer is at the crux of the experience. A set of spatial sequences where perspective is morphed to change the relationships between audience and space, and reveal deeper stories about the building

"...to be lost is to be fully present, and to be fully present is to be capable of being in uncertainty and mystery.” 
 
― Rebecca Solnit, A Field Guide to Getting Lost
 
 
      Erno Goldfingers’ Balfron Tower was constructed in 1968, as a high-rise communal estate proudly facing upwards to a hopeful and social future. Today in 2014, the tower which seems abandoned rather than hosting a vivid community, is facing a new transition, not solely in its interior architecture but even more so in its value and character as a social development.
      During the Vertical Carnival, an event organized to celebrate the architecture of Goldfinger in its meanwhile use, we were invited along with other artists and designers to create an immersive installation inside one of the flats in the tower - 89. Our group aspired to celebrate the past of the Balfron tower, while simultaneously confronting its unknown future. The installation aimed to trigger an experience of fluidity and uncertainty through reflective surfaces and tilted planes. The users were immersed in an augmented reality, which provoked losing sense and perception of space, while observing traces from the past and speculations for the future.
 
 
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